All posts tagged: dinner

Soup Joumou | Sweet & Sorrel

Haitian Pumpkin Soup Joumou

Happy Sunday! This vegetarian Haitian Pumpkin Soup Joumou is a meatless take on a famous dish, and it’s sure to please any crowd. Usually reserved for special occasions, this heart soup is the perfect substitute for a game-day chili (because, what’s a more special occasion than game day?!). Soup Joumou is typically served on January 1, as a way to ring in the New Year and Haiti’s independence. It’s believed that Haitian slaves were not allowed to have this soup, which was instead reserved for white French slave owners. When Haiti gained it’s independence, freed Haitians celebrated by eating the soup they were once forbidden to enjoy. With a story like that, it’s impossible not to love this delicious soup. Traditionally made from calabaza pumpkin (i.e. Caribbean squash), potatoes, and a flavorful stock, this soup is often served with beef and pasta. (Note: you can replace the pumpkin with butternut squash). My version of soup joumou keeps many of the traditional ingredients, but removes the meat. But trust me, it’s not missing out on any …

New Year Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce

Happy 2019! The first Sunday of the new year ushers in new beginnings, and there is no better way to start the year than with these New Year Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce! This East-meets-West (Indies) take on fresh Vietnamese spring rolls is a bright, colorful recipe that takes only 10 minute to make and tastes amazingly delicious. The start of another year has inspired me to try some new things, and this dish is one of them. For one thing, this recipe is Asian inspired, a first for the blog. I liked the idea of starting the new year by trying to make food from a different part of the world, and the challenge of trying to add Caribbean flavors to an Asian dish was pretty exciting. It was also surprisingly easy as Vietnamese and Caribbean food actually overlap quite a bit! Fruits like mangoes and herbs such as mint are commonly used in both cuisines and both are featured in this recipe. The second new thing about this recipe is that it …

Braised Oxtail | Sweet & Sorrel

Braised Oxtails & Mashed Potatoes

Happy Sunday! Can you believe 2018 is almost over?! Let’s ring in the new year with some Braised Oxtail and Mashed Potatoes. This recipe takes two classic dishes from my Jamaican and American holiday dinner table and combines them into one fantastic meal. The result? A holiday mash up that’s sure to please! The end of the year always brings great memories for me because Christmas is my favorite time of year (For those who celebrate, I wish you a belated Merry Christmas!). But my Christmases look pretty different than most people. Growing up, we didn’t have a snow white Christmas. I didn’t have a clue who Santa was (and I’m still a little confused). There were no snowmen, no gingerbread houses, no caroling, and no chestnuts roasting over an open fire. I didn’t know any of this stuff even existed until my family and I moved to America. At first, I was a bit envious of all these Christmas traditions, and I wasn’t able to appreciate all the wonderful traditions my parents and I brought …

Kabocha Squash Curry | Sweet & Sorrel

Kabocha Squash Curry

Happy Sunday! It’s officially fall here on the East Coast, which means it’s now squash season! This Kabocha Squash Curry is the perfect cold-weather meal. It’s healthy, hearty, and full of flavor. First, a confession: most West Indians aren’t familiar with the term squash. In Jamaica, we call every squash a pumpkin. Seriously! Butternut squash? That’s pumpkin to a Jamaican. Acorn squash? Yup, that’s pumpkin too. Spaghetti Squash? This is not very common in Jamaica but we’d probably call it pumpkin. And of course the traditional Halloween pumpkin is called a pumpkin. It can get pretty confusing! I remember one day after coming to the U.S., I was out grocery shopping with my mom and we were talking out loud, trying to figure out which of the items labelled “squash” was actually the West Indian pumpkin we were used to eating. A fellow shopper overheard our discussion and walked over to us, asking if we were Jamaicans. When we said yes, he said he knew we had to be because we were calling everything pumpkin. …

Red Peas and Kale Stew

Happy Sunday! It’s October, which means soup season has officially arrived! This Red Peas and Kale Soup is hearty, flavorful, and takes no time at all to whip up! This soup is the definition of “comfort soup” and is guaranteed to keep you warm this fall. Soups are one of my favorite foods. There’s just something so comforting about a warm bowl of broth that combines many different flavors into one spoonful. People often associate soup with cold weather, and because of that, might not expect soup to be very popular in the Caribbean. But that’s not true at all! The Caribbean has many different types of soup, with some of the most popular being chicken foot soup (our version of a chicken noodle soup) and manish water (with goat and green bananas). The Caribbean is also famous for many different kinds of peas soups (in Jamaica, we say “peas” instead of “beans”). This recipe is loosely inspired by red peas soup, a thick and creamy soup traditionally made from uncooked red kidney beans that …

Grilled Peanut Crusted Suya Chicken Kebabs

Happy Sunday! I have received a lot of requests for meals that include meat, so today, I bring you… MEAT! These Grilled Peanut Crusted Suya Chicken Kebabs are my take on the popular West African street food. These kebabs have a unique spicy flavor and are SOO GOOD! Suya refers to the grilled meat kebabs popularized in Nigeria and other parts of West Africa by the Hausa people. Suya can be made from a variety of meats, most often beef or chicken, but also intestinal meats such as kidney or tripe. What makes suya different from other kinds of grilled skewered meat is the marinade, made from a blend of ground peanuts and various spices. After the suya meat marinates, it is grilled to perfection and served with even more spices. When I first learned of suya, I instantly fell in love. I think as a Caribbean, my appreciation for spice and a great marinade got me hooked! And it didn’t hurt that the suya marinade included peanuts, one of my all time favorite things. What’s better …

Tropical Root Vegetable Salad | Sweet & Sorrel

Tropical Root Vegetable Salad with Salsa Rosada Dressing

Hi lovelies! I took a week off from posting on the blog to work on some new recipes for the fall, and today I am back to share this Tropical Root Vegetable Salad with Salsa Rosada Dressing! This salad is packed with a colorful mix of fruits and roasted vegetables and is finished with my version of the popular Latin American sauce/salad dressing. It’s vibrant and fun! Read on to learn more. This past week away from the blog has been a bit sad, because I truly enjoy posting and hearing from you all every Sunday. But it has also been rewarding. This week has helped me to set a vision for the blog. I have always wanted Sweet & Sorrel to be a place where I can share a bit of myself through my food. My vision is to continue to post recipes inspired by the flavors of the Caribbean (which includes many different parts of the world since so many countries have influenced, or are influenced by, the Caribbean!). But I also want to challenge …

Ackee & Saltfish with Plantain Gnocchi | Sweet & Sorrel

“Ackee” & Saltfish with Plantain Gnocchi

Hey everyone! Cheers to another Sunday in August. August is one of my favorite months of the year: the weather is (usually) sunny, there’s always something fun to do outside, and best of all, August is the month many Caribbean countries (including Jamaica) celebrate their emancipation and independence days. So in honor of Jamaica’s birthday, this week’s recipe is a spin on Jamaica’s national dish! Keep reading to find out how to make this amazing “Ackee” & Saltfish with Plantain Gnocchi! Ackee is a fruit that originated in West Africa. When the fruit ripens, the ackee pod opens up to reveal a soft yellow meat that Jamaicans cook and pair with steamed saltfish (salted cod). As a child, I used to love separating the ackee from its large black seed and eating the cooked ackee fruit. But as I got older, something changed. Which leads me to a confession – I actually really dislike ackee! Including last week’s Coffee Crusted Tofu Salad, this is the second week in a row that I’ve made a dish …

Coffee Crusted Tofu Salad with Turmeric Ginger Vinaigrette

Hi all, Welcome to the first Sunday in August! It’s been an awesome month so far, mainly because only 5 days have gone by. But those 5 days matter, because it means there are now that many fewer days left of summer. Boo! The transition from summer to fall also means its time for me to start thinking about swapping out my summer recipes for fall ones. Usually, that means replacing my go-to salads with warm, hearty bowls of vegetarian chili and soups. But this D.C. weather has me all out of sorts! One day it’s rainy and cold, the next day it’s 90 degrees! Sometimes I have no idea whether to make a summer meal or a winter meal. Which is why today, I’m sharing the recipe for a Coffee Crusted Tofu Salad with Ginger Turmeric Vinaigrette. This salad is the perfect “I have no clue what season it is” meal option, because it can work in any weather. Read below to find out more! Let’s get one thing out of the way first …

Ethiopian Berbere Salmon | Sweet & Sorrel

Ethiopian Berbere Crusted Salmon with Timatim Tomato Salad

Hi there, I hope everyone had a wonderful weekend. I know I did! Before I get into why it was such a fun weekend, let’s talk about this Ethiopian Berbere Crusted Salmon with Timatim Tomato Salad! Let’s face it, salmon can be kind of boring but not today! This simple salmon recipe cooks in just 15 minutes and requires very little prep! Its flavorful and unique. A perfect summer cookout dish! Okay, back to why this weekend was so fun (hint: this salmon was definitely a factor). One thing I love about summer in D.C. is rooftop cookouts. In D.C., there aren’t 4 seasons, there are 5: the fifth being rooftop cookout season. Seriously. Just visit the city in the summertime and you will find at least one rooftop packed with people grilling, chilling, or some combination of the two. And this weekend, the D.C. weather gods decided to smile down on the city, giving us a perfect sunny and humid-free day. So what did I do? Host a rooftop cookout of course! I am definitely …